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A Writer's Accouterments
PAGE THREE
October 2006

Finally, one thing I do have access to, and intend to make copious use of during NaNoWriMo, is music. I’m usually listening to something-or-other anyway, but since I first started writing, I’ve needed music to set the mood. Sure, there’s a WriMo online radio station, for one option, but that’s too easy. Some people make a soundtrack or playlist specifically for their novel. I have friends who’ve done this, and we’ve exchanged a few over the years. I’m jellus! I don’t have anything like that… yet.

However, I do have a couple writing-specific playlists of my own. I’ve been using my Literary one for inspiration, usually when I’m working critically. This started as a suggestion of literary songs in one of Fametracker’s now-defunct music threads, and I became possessed with collecting songs to fill my “literary music” requirement. All songs on this playlist are either about a work/author, inspired by a work/author, a song version of a work, about writing, or contain other writerly references in a significant way. Would you have guessed that Led Zepplin did a bunch of stuff based on Tolkein? Neither would I. Nor did I know that The Cure had so many songs with references to literature… and Camus, no less! Bowie provided a pile of Orwell stuff with his attempted 1984 musical. (And no, I could not handle G&R’s “November Rain,” Jackson Brown’s “Tender is the Night,” The Monotones’s “Who Wrote the Book of Love,” nor especially Leonard Nimoy’s “Ballad of Bilbo Baggins” on this playlist! So don't write and say "What about Guns 'n Roses-" NO! NO!)

There are tons of possibilities for a Literary Playlist. You could grab bands with literary-inspired names – Pretty Girls Make Graves, Alice in Chains, Atreyu, Shakespeare’s Sister, Aerosmith – and fill up your iPod pretty damned quickly that way. Once could argue that the entire musical oeuvre of The Doors, Aimee Mann, Joni Mitchell, Paul Simon, Leonard Cohen, Tori Amos, Bob Dylan and so on, could be considered poetry. If we start pulling any and every song with biblical references, we’ll be doing that all November instead of writing! There are whole operas of literary works, if you’re so inclined. Heck there’s a Gertrude Stein opera, Four Saints in Three Acts, if you dare! One of my favorite discoveries was a pair of CDs called Songs Inspired by Literature; the sibl project benefits literacy programs, so you can purchase the CDs guilt-free.

Accordingly, and in the spirit of NaNoWriMo, lemme share my Literary playlist with y’all. Enjoy, and good luck… I’ll see you when that countdown clock stops ticking on November 30 th! (And if you have an mp3 of “My Baby Loves a Bunch of Authors” that you could swing my way….)

  • 10,000 Maniacs – “Cherry Tree” (a play by Chekov)
  • 10,000 Maniacs – “Hey Jack Kerouac”
  • Aimee Mann – “Frankenstein”
  • Aimee Mann – “Ghost World” (graphic novel by Daniel Clowes)
  • Aimee Mann – “Humpty Dumpty”
  • Albert Campbell & Irving Gillette (Henry Burr) (1914) – “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm”
  • American Quartet with Billy Murray – “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm” (1914)
  • Ana Porter – “Hunger” (inspired by T.S. Eliot's poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”)
  • Anna Nalick – “Breathe (2AM)” (includes the lines “2AM and I'm still awake, writing a song/If I get it all down on paper, it's no longer inside of me”)
  • Anny Celsi – “T'was Her Hunger Brought Me Down” (Dreiser's novel Sister Carrie)
  • Avenged Sevenfold – “Chapter Four” (based on the fourth chapter of Genesis)
  • Babyshambles – “What Katy Did Next” (The song’s likely about Kate Moss, but the title is one of Susan Coolidge’s Katy books, a turn–of–the–century girls’ series)
  • Bad Religion – “Stranger Than Fiction”
  • Bangles – “Stealing Rosemary" (elements of Rapunzel. I think there's also a tie to Hamlet's Ophelia, but I'm not positive)
  • Belle & Sebastian – “Put the Book Back on the Shelf
  • Belle & Sebastian – “Wrapped Up in Books"
  • Billy Bragg – “Walt Whitman's Niece”
  • Blind Guardian – “The Bard's Song (The Hobbit)”
  • Blind Guardian – Nightfall in Middle–Earth (an album based on Tolkien's The Silmarillion)
  • Blur – “Parklife” (in an interview, Damon Albarn said, “London Fields inspired ‘Parklife.’ That book changed my outlook on life."
  • Bob & Marcia – “Young, Gifted and Black” (a Langston Hughes poem; recorded by multiple artists, originally by Nina Simone)
  • Bob Dylan – “Ballad of a Thin Man” (F. Scott Fitzgerald)
  • Bob Dylan – “Desolation Row” (multiple references, Steinbeck’s Cannery Row, Eliot’s “The Waste Land,” Hugo’s Hunchback of Notre-Dame Kerouac’s “Desolation Peak,” Pound, Eliot)
  • Bob Dylan – “Every Grain Of Sand” (inspired by William Blake's poem Auguries of Innocence)
  • Bob Dylan – “Highway 61 Revisited” (biblical story of Abraham and Isaac)
  • Bob Hillman – “Tolstoy” (War and Peace, specifically)
  • Bright Eyes – “A Perfect Sonnet”
  • Broadcast – “Tender Buttons” (a Gertrude Stein work)
  • Bruce Springsteen – “The Ghost of Tom Joad” (Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath)
  • Bush – “Machinehead” (references Howl by Allen Ginsburg)
  • Cake – “Open Book”
  • Cake – “Shadow Stabbing” (includes the lines “Adjectives on the typewriter/He moves his words like a prizefighter”)
  • Cake – “Writer’s Block”
  • Cause & Effect – “In Shakespeare's Garden
  • Cause & Effect – “Farewell to Arms” (Ernest Hemingway novel)
  • Cause & Effect – “The Echoing Green” (a poem by William Blake)
  • Chuck Berry – “Brown Eyed Handsome Man” (supposedly the second verse was inspired by Venus in Furs)
  • Coldplay – “Don't Panic” (Douglas Adams’s Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy)
  • Crash Test Dummies – “Afternoons and Coffeespoons” (Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”)
  • Cream – “Tales of Brave Ulysses" (more of The Odyssey)
  • Dashboard Confessional – “Ender Will Save Us All” (refers to an Orson Scott Card character)
  • David Bowie – "Big Brother" (more Orwell’s 1984)
  • David Bowie – “1984” (Orwell’s novel)
  • David Bowie – “ Suffragette City” (includes reference to the book A Clockwork Orange; also covered by Alice in Chains)
  • David Bowie – “The Man Who Sold the World” (based Hugh Mearns’s poem, “ The Psychoed”; also covered by Nirvana, Simple Minds, and Midge Ure)
  • David Bowie – “We Are the Dead” (more Orwell’s 1984)
  • David Lamotte – “Dark and Deep” (based on the Robert Frost poem, “Stopping By Woods…”)
  • Deb Talan – “Tell Your Story Walking” (inspired by Jonathan Lethem's novel Motherless Brooklyn)
  • Deborah Pardes – “7th Step” (inspired by Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes)
  • Deborah Pardes – “Bobo's Country” (inspired by Alexandra Fuller's memoir Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight)
  • Dee Adams – “ Pennsylvania” (inspired by Orson Scott Card's novel Songmaster)
  • Derek and the Dominoes – “I Am Yours” (inspired by Layla and Majnun, a work by the Persian poet Nizami)
  • Derek And The Dominoes – “Layla” (inspired by Layla and Majnun, a work by the Persian poet Nizami)
  • Devo – “Freedom of Choice” (references one of Aesop’s fables, The Dog and the Bone)
  • Diane Zeigler – “The Legend of Enoch Arden” (a Tennyson poem)
  • Dire Straits – “Lady Writer”
  • Donovan – “Riki Tiki Tavi” (a Kipling story)
  • Duran Duran – “Last Chance on the Stairway” (name checks Voltaire)
  • Duran Duran – “Wild Boys” (The Wild Boys by William S. Burroughs)
  • Eileen Laverty – “Tread Softly” (inspired by the Yeats poem “He Wishes for the Clothes of Heaven”)
  • Elise Carlisle – “Pu–Leeze! Mister Hemingway!”
  • Elvis Costello – “Every Day I Write the Book”
  • Enya – “I Dreamt I Dwelt in Marble Halls” (an aria that is mentioned in several of Joyce’s works, including Finnegans Wake and The Dubliners)
  • Enya – “No Holly for Miss Quinn” (One of Miss Read’s novels of English country life)
  • Essence – Still Crying (inspired by Mark Levine's poem "Work Song")
  • Fleetwood Mac – “Rhiannon” (Welsh mythology, and inspired by Mary Leader’s Triad)
  • Fleetwood Mac – “Running Through The Garden” ( Hawthorne's “Rappaccini's Daughter)
  • Fra Lippo Lippi – “Shouldn't Have to Be Like That” (sort of cheating, because the song isn’t literary, but the band name is… based on a Browning poem. I love this song, though)
  • Garbage – “The Trick Is to Keep Breathing” (a novel by Scottish author Janice Galloway)
  • Gaskit – “Peel This Away” (Elie Wiesel's Night)
  • Gatsbys American Dream – "Fable" (Golding's Lord of the Flies)
  • Gatsbys American Dream – “My Name is Ozymandias” (Shelley’s poem, “Ozymandias”)
  • Genesis – “Home By the Sea” (Homer's The Odyssey)
  • Genesis – “Mama” (inspired by David Niven’sThe Moon's a Balloon )
  • Grace Slick – “ReJoyce” (Joyce’s Ulysses)
  • Green Day – “Who Wrote Holden Caulfield?” (references the main character of Salinger’ The Catcher in the Rye)
  • Indigo Girls – “Romeo And Juliet”
  • Indigo Girls – “Virgina Woolf”
  • Ira Marlowe – “The Wish” (inspired by Gothe's play Faust)
  • Iron Maiden – “Brave New World” (Huxley’s novel, which took its title, in turn, from Shakespeare’s The Tempest)
  • Iron Maiden – “Murders in the Rue Morgue” (Edgar Allen Poe’s short story)
  • Iron Maiden – “Rime Of The Ancient Mariner” (Coleridge’s poem)
  • Jefferson Airplane – “White Rabbit” ( Alice in Wonderland, and in turn provided the title for the fictional “diary” of drug abuse, Go Ask Alice)
  • Jill Tracy – “Evil Night Together” (inspired by Luc Sante's historical account Low Life)
  • Jimmy Buffett – “Barefoot Children in the Rain” (Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn)
  • John Cale – “Graham Greene”
  • John Cale – “Macbeth"
  • John Taylor – “Look Homeward Angel” (a Thomas Wolfe novel)
  • Joy Division – “Dead Souls” (a Gogol novel/prose poem)
  • Judy Collins – “The Bells of Rhymney” (see The Byrds)
  • Judy Collins – “Anathea” (based on Bob Dylan’s recording of a folk song, “Seven Curses”; both are based on a folk tale, "The Maid Freed from the Gallows")
  • Justin Wells – “The Last Temptation of Odysseus” (Homer’s The Odyssey. Duh)
  • Kansas – “Dust in the Wind (inspired by a book of Native American poetry)
  • Kate Bush – “The Sensual World” (Joyce’s Ulysses; the song is based on Molly Bloom’s final soliloquy, i.e. “say yes” etc.)
  • Kate Bush – “ Wuthering Heights” (a Bronte novel)
  • Kate Bush "Cloudbusting" (inspired by The Book of Dreams by Peter Reich)
  • Larry Kenneth Potts – “The Ballard of Poker Alice” (inspired by Stephen Ambrose's historical novel Nothing Like it in the World)
  • Led Zeppelin – “Misty Mountain Hop” (Tolkein’s The Hobbit)
  • Led Zeppelin – “Ramble On” (more of Tolkien's Lord of the Rings )
  • Led Zeppelin – “The Battle of Evermore” (Tolkein’s Return of the King)
  • Leonard Cohen – The Future (I first read the lyrics to these songs as poetry in his book Stranger Music)
  • Liars – “Read the Book That Wrote Itself”
  • Loggins & Messina – “House At Pooh Corner” (A. A. Milne’s novel)
  • Loreena McKennitt – “Cymbeline" (a Shakespeare play)
  • Loreena McKennitt – “Dante's Prayer” (The Divine Comedy)
  • Loreena McKennitt – “Lady of Shallot” (musical version of Tennyson’s poem)
  • Loreena McKennitt – “The Highwayman” (musical version of Alfred Noyes’s poem)
  • Lynn Harrison – “Einstein's Brain” (inspired by Michael Paterniti's memoir Driving Mr. Albert)
  • Marillion – “Grendel” (“Beowulf,” by way of John Gardner's contemporary novel Grendel)
  • Marta Gomez – “Paula Ausente” (inspired by Isabel Allende’s novel Paula)
  • Metallica – “For Whom the Bell Tolls” (based on a section of Heminway’s novel; Hemingway, in turn, got the title from a John Donne poem)
  • Metallica – “The Call Of Ktulu” (inspired by H.P. Lovecraft’s Call of Cthulu)
  • Metallica – “The Thing That Should Not Be” (inspired by H.P. Lovecraft’s Call of Cthulu)
  • Michelle (Bloom) – “Listen (The Silences)” (inspired by Thomas Merton's Essays Raids on the Unspeakable)
  • Modest Mouse – “Bukowski”
  • Morrissey – “Billy Budd” (a Herman Melville short story)
  • Morrissey – “We Hate it When Our Friends Become Successful” (attributed to an Oscar Wilde quote: Anybody can sympathise with the sufferings of a friend, but it requires a very fine nature to sympathise with a friend's success.
  • Muse – “Ruled by Secrecy” (Jim Marrs’s nonfiction book, Rule By Secrecy)
  • Muse – “The Small Print” (Goethe’s Faust)
  • Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds – “There She Goes, My Beautiful World” (an ode to writer's block)
  • Nirvana – “Scentless Apprentice” (Patrick Süskind’s Perfume)
  • Nirvana – “Pennyroyal Tea” (name-checks Leonard Cohen)
  • Pat Benatar – “ Wuthering Heights” (a Bronte novel; see Kate Bush)
  • Patti Witten – “Goin' Back To Moline” (inspired by Robert Clark's novel Mr. White's Confession)
  • Paul Simon – “You Can Call Me Al” (some suggest that this was inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy)
  • Peter Gabriel – “Kiss That Frog” (inspired by Bruno Betelheim’s [YAY!] critical work on fairy tales, The Uses Of Enchantment)
  • Peter Gabriel – “ Mercy Street” (based on Anne Sexton’s book of poetry and play, both titled Mercy Street)
  • Peter Gabriel – “The Family and the Fishing Net” (inspired by the poetry of Dylan Thomas)
  • Phranc – “Gertrude Stein”
  • Poe – “A Rose Is a Rose” (Gertrude Stein’s poem)
  • Procol Harum – “A Whiter Shade of Pale” (according to songfacts.com, “the lyrics came from a poem by Keith Reid, and were a collection of abstract phrases about boy/girl relationships using sailing metaphors. They sound very profound, but were actually a spoof of psychedelic lyrics popular in songs at the time”; Annie Lennox does a cover version as well)
  • Public Image Ltd – “Brave New World” (a Huxley novel)
  • R.E.M. – “Falls To Climb” (Shirley Jackson’s short story, The Lottery”
  • R.E.M. – “The Outsiders” (evokes the S.E. Hinton cult novel)
  • Radiohead – “Exit Music (For A Film)” (Romeo and Juliet)
  • Radiohead – “Paranoid Android” (Douglas Adams’s Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, specifically, Marvin the Paranoid Android)
  • Rage Against the Machine – “The Ghost of Tom Joad” (a cover of Springsteen’s song)
  • Ray Manzarek – “He Can't Come Today” (Beckett's play Waiting for Godot)
  • Red Hot Chili Peppers – “Yertle The Turtle” (a Dr. Seuss picture book)
  • Rosanne Cash – “The Summer I Read Colette”
  • Rush – “Losing It” (inspired by Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises and For Whom the Bell Tolls)
  • Rush – “Rivendell” (more of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings)
  • Rush – “The Necromancer” (more of Tolkien's Lord of the Rings )
  • Rush – “Tom Sawyer”
  • Rush – “Xanadu” (Coleridge's poem “Kubla Khan”; note, Olivia Newton-John’s "Xanadu," while name-checking the mythological place, is NOT inspired by the poem!)
  • Ryan Adams – “Sylvia Plath”
  • Sarah Harmer – “Lodestar" - (references D.H. Lawrence)
  • Serge Gainsbourg – “ Baudelaire”
  • Scarth Locke – “Bucking Bronco” (a Shel Silverstein poem; Silverstein recorded live and/or musical versions of his own poetry, and "Little Abigale and the Beautiful Pony" is freakin' awesome!)
  • Seven Mary Three – “Roderigo” (inspired by Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude)
  • Simon & Garfunkel – “A Simple Desultory Philippic (Or How I Was Robert McNamara'd Into Submission)” (name-checks a bunch of different authors)
  • Simon & Garfunkel – “For Emily, Whenever I May Find Her” (some sources claim this is about Dickinson)
  • Simon & Garfunkel – “Richard Cory” (a retelling of a poem by Edward Arlington Robinson; trivia: I make my students write compare/contrast essays on the poem and song)
  • Simon & Garfunkel – “The Dangling Conversation” (references Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost)
  • Sonic Youth – “The Empty Page”
  • Sonic Youth – “Schizophrenia” (Philip K. Dick)
  • Stereophonics – “Mr. Writer”
  • Stephanie Riggio – “Voice Inside (Song of Siddhartha)” (Herman Hesse’s novel, Siddhartha)
  • Steve Earle – “Dixieland” (inspired by Michael Shaara's historical novel The Killer Angels)
  • Sting – “La Belle Dame Sans Regrets” (Sting said in an interview that the Keats poem “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” is “vaguely the inspiration” for this song)
  • Sting – “Moon Over Bourbon Street” (Anne Rice’s Interview With a Vampire)
  • Sting – “Sister Moon” (includes the line from Shakespeare’s sonnet, “My Mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun”)
  • Sting – “The Book of My Life”
  • Suzanne Vega – “Calypso” (Homer’s The Odyssey. Again)
  • T.Rex – “Ride A White Swan” (Tolkien's The Hobbit)
  • The Alan Parsons Project – “Eye in the Sky” (Orwell’s 1984).
  • The Alan Parsons Project – Tales of Mystery and Imagination (an entire album inspired by Edgar Allan Poe stories)
  • The Beatles – “Golden Slumbers” (inspired by Thomas Dekker poem. Ben Folds also covers it)
  • The Beatles – “I Am The Walrus” (John Lennon fucking with Lewis Carroll’s “The Walrus and the Carpenter”)
  • The Beatles – “Paperback Writer”
  • The Beatles – “The Inner Light” (lyrics are a translation of a section of the Tao Te Ching)
  • The Beatles – Tomorrow Never Knows (inspired by Tibetan Book of the Dead, not to mention Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert's book The Psychedelic Experience )
  • The Byrds – “Turn! Turn! Turn!” (lyrics from Book of Ecclesiastes; see also, Judy Collins)
  • The Byrds – “The Bells of Rhymney” (a folk song based on an old Welsh poem)
  • The Charlatans UK – “The Bell And The Butterfly
  • The Cure – “A Letter to Elise" (supposedly based on Les Enfants Terribles by Jean Cocteau)
  • The Cure – “Bananafish Bones” (a J.D. Salinger story, “A Perfect Day for Bananafish”)
  • The Cure – “Charlotte Sometimes” (a novel by Penelope Farmer)
  • The Cure – “How Beautiful You Are” (based on a Baudelaire poem, “ The Eyes Of The Poor”)
  • The Cure – “Killing an Arab” (Camus’s The Stranger)
  • The Cure – “Splintered in Her Head” ( b–side of "Charlotte Sometimes," also based on the novel)
  • The Cure – “The Empty World” (more Charlotte Sometimes by Penelope Farmer)
  • The Cure – “Adonais” (Shelley’s elegy for Keats)
  • The Cure – “The Drowning Man” (inspired by the Gormenghast novels by Mervyn Peake)
  • The Cure – “Treasure” (includes a line from a Christina Rossetti poem, “Remember”)
  • The Decemberists – “The Engine Driver” (includes line “And I am a writer, writer of fictions”)
  • The Devils – “Aztec Moon” (according to an interview with Nick Rhodes and Stephen Duffy, “The lyrics to ‘Aztec Moon’ are from ‘Mexico City Blues’ by Jack Kerouac.”)
  • The Devils – “Hawks Do not Share” (chapter title from [my favorite!] Hemingway’s A Movable Feast, about Scott and Zelda’s fucked–up relationship)
  • The Devils – “Lost Decade” (again, I’m fudging a little with this, but it reminds me of Hemingway’s epigraph to The Sun Also Rises, Gertrude Stein’s ostensible comment that “You are all a lost generation. Plus the song sounds like a Hemingway novel.)
  • The Divine Comedy – “Annabel Lee" (Poe’s poem)
  • The Doors – “Been Down So Long” (inspired by Richard Farina's Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up To Me)
  • The Doors – “L.A. Woman” (inspired by John Rechy’s book, City of Night)
  • The Doors – “Not to Touch the Earth” – part of Jim Morrison’s poetic work, The Celebration of the Lizard)
  • The Doors – “The Crystal Ship” (inspired from a Celtic legend in The Book Of The Dun Cow; covered by both Duran Duran and X)
  • The Kingston Trio – “Where Have All The Flowers Gone?” (inspired by Mikhail Sholokhov's novel And Quiet Flows the Don)
  • The Go-Betweens – “Karen” (includes the lyrics “ Helps me find Hemingway/Helps me find Rene/Helps me find Brett/Helps me find Chandler/Helps me find James Joyce”)
  • The Go-Betweens – “Here Comes A City” (name-checks Dostoyevsky)
  • The Pet Shop Boys – “West End Girls” – (according to interview clips posted at songfacts.com, one influence was Eliot's The Wasteland)
  • The Pixies – “Dead” (biblical story of David and Bathsheba)
  • The Police – “Don't Stand So Close to Me” (references Nabokov’s Lolita)
  • The Police – “Roxanne” (references the Cyrano de Bergerac play, Roxana by Daniel Defoe)
  • The Police – “Tea in the Sahara” (The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles)
  • The Police – “Wrapped Around Your Finger” (references Greek mythology, specifically, The Odyssey; influenced by the Faustus myth as told by both Goethe and Marlowe)
  • The Rolling Stones – “Sympathy For The Devil” (inspired by The Master and Margarita, by Mikhail Bulgakov; covered by Bryan Ferry)
  • The Smiths – “Cemetery Gates” (name checks Keats and Yeats, also references a line from Shakespeare’s Richard III)
  • The Smiths – “Half a Person” (incorporates a line from John Fowles’s novel, The Collector: “ Caliban is only half a person at the best of times”; accordingly, Shakespeare’s The Tempest)
  • The Smiths – “Handsome Devil” (references both A Boy In The Bush by D. H. Lawrence and Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut)
  • The Smiths – “Shakespeare's Sister” (references Virginia Woolf’s famous speculation in A Room of One’s Own; also references lines from By Grand Central Station I Sat Down And Wept, by Elizabeth Smart, a book Morrissey incorporates into a number of song lyrics)
  • The Smiths – “The Night Has Opened My Eyes” (lyrics inspired by A Taste of Honey, a play by Shelagh Delaney. Again, Morrissey uses this literary reference a lot, especially on Louder Than Bombs)
  • The Smiths – “ London” (more references from By Grand Central Station I Sat Down And Wept)
  • The Smiths – “Paint a Vulgar Picture” (the title is a quote attributed to Oscar Wilde)
  • The Smiths – “This Charming Man” (ostensibly refers to Loving, by Henry Green)
  • The Smiths – “William, It Was Really Nothing” (Keith Waterhouse’s novel, Billy Liar)
  • The Soggy Bottom Boys – “Man of Constant Sorrow” (from the movie Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?, which is based on The Odyssey)
  • The Stone Roses – “Full Fathom Five” (references Ariel’s song from Shakespeare’s The Tempest)
  • The Triffids – “Tender Is The Night” (Fitzgerald novel, whose title was inspired by a Keats poem)
  • The Velvet Underground – “Venus in Furs” (inspired by the S&M novel of the same title)
  • The Waterboys – “The Stolen Child” (musical adaptation of the Yeats poem)
  • The Zombies – “A Rose for Emily” (William Faulkner's short story “A Rose for Emily”)
  • They Might Be Giants – “I Should Be Allowed To Think” (references Ginsberg’s poem “Howl”)
  • Tom Waits – “A Good Man Is Hard To Find” (a Flannery O’Connor story)
  • Tori Amos – "Cornflake Girl" (about a character in Alice Walker's novel Possessing the Secret of Joy)
  • U2 – “40” (Psalm 40)
  • U2 – “A Sort of Homecoming” (“Poetry is a sort of homecoming” is a line from poet Paul Celan)
  • U2 – “Shadows and Tall Trees” (chapter title in Golding’s Lord Of The Flies)
  • U2 – “Zooropa” (influenced by William Gibson’s works)
  • U2 – The Ocean (mentions Dorian Gray, from Oscar Wilde’s book The Picture of Dorian Gray)
  • Vera Lynn – “The White Cliffs of Dover” (numerous literary references to the cliff exists, but the most well–known is Matthew Arnold’s poem)
  • Vicki Randle – “Don't Let Me Fall” (inspired by James McBride's memoir The Color of Water)

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